6 reasons you really should care about your poop health

This text is sensitive. Try generating new copy.

Do you REALLY care about your poop health? You should.

Your health is all around you. When you see a sick animal, you’re usually quick to take action: make it better. When you see someone in need, you lend a hand. When you’re so sick, you go to the doctor’s office. When you hear about a disease outbreak, you worry. Your health can be just as visible as an animal or an injured person, though it is more difficult to see. As humans, we understand that everyone has a body. It is our job to make sure that it is functioning well so that we can live a healthy life.

Excrement is having a moment, from smiling poo emojis to poop cafes to viral turd charts. However, many people wonder if they should be concerned about their feces health.

Yes, that is our response. Bowel motions can indicate whether you’re in good health or if you’re experiencing health issues before other symptoms appear. In this post, we’ll go over six things to look out for when it comes to your poop.

++++

Sure, you’ve seen the poop charts that go viral on social media.

You’ve guffawed at the wacky smiling turds. Alternatively, there are some hilarious poo GIFs.

Perhaps you laughed at the thought of a feces café, which is currently one of the biggest food trends in Russia and East Asia (and has already arrived in Toronto).

Aside from toilet-shaped tableware and feces emoticons,

Should we be concerned about the state of our poop?

Yes, in fact.

Your feces might reveal a lot about your personality.

Poop that looks good can signal that your health and fitness are on track. It can, for example, tell you:

  • Your abdominal muscles are powerful.
  • Your gastrointestinal system is in good working order.
  • You’re receiving a lot of fiber and other nutrients in your diet.
  • Your hormones are in a good mood.
  • You don’t appear to be unduly stressed.
  • Your intestinal flora is healthy and balanced.

If your poop isn’t looking so hot, it could be telling you something. For example, feces that isn’t so great might say something like:

  • It’s possible that you’ll need to improve your diet.
  • You can be worried and stressed.
  • It’s possible that you’ll need to drink more water.
  • You could be suffering from a food intolerance.
  • To assist things move forward more smoothly, you might need to increase your everyday activities.
  • You could be dealing with a health problem that is preventing you from looking and feeling your best.

Your feces is a hint.

We don’t talk doody on the first date in coaching. But we do get there in the end.

Because our in-house (as well as Certified) coaches understand:

The state of one’s digestive system can reveal a lot about one’s overall health.

Your feces can help us get to the bottom of problems if you’re feeling low-energy or sluggish; if you’re having trouble losing weight, feeling good, and/or getting in shape. (Sorry.)

First and foremost, examine your feces.

Peek inside the toilet as if you were a toddler.

Examine the graph below and respond honestly:

What is the majority of the time the quality of your feces?

What is your poo quality like most of the time?

This graph is based on the Bristol Stool Scale, a tool created by the University of Bristol to make it easier for patients to talk to their doctors about their poop.

As you can see, the kind 4 poo is the one to aim for. Kinds 3 and 5 are decent, while types 1, 2, 6, and 7 scream “improvement required.”

Here are a few questions to ponder:

  • How frequently do you go? Aim for one to three bowel movements every day.
  • How does it make you feel? If you didn’t consume spicy street meat the night before, your bowel motions should be painless and rapid. They shouldn’t necessitate stifling, a frightened dash to the restroom, or sitting long enough to complete the whole New York Times crossword puzzle.
  • What hue is it, exactly? Brown is the color of healthy feces. Bile, which emulsifies dietary fat and aids digestion, is responsible for the color. However, some regular day-to-day alterations may occur, such as green poo after eating leafy greens or crimson feces after eating beets.
  • What does it smell like? Although it will never smell like roses, really foul-smelling feces can indicate underlying problems.
  • Is it a sinker or a floater? Healthy feces can accomplish either, but it can also reveal your diet’s fat (float) to fiber (sink) ratio.

Of course, excrement can differ from one day to the next. One day of rabbit raisins or post-burrito hijinks does not imply that you have a serious health problem.

You’re looking for a long-term trend, something that you’re familiar with.

You should have a fair idea of where your poo falls on the health scale based on the responses to all of these questions.

There are six things your poop might be trying to tell you.

If your poop is as smooth as an otter and as consistent as a Swiss watch, that’s fantastic.

If your poo could use some… im-poo-vement (pardon the pun)… Continue reading. It could be a cry for assistance.

The good news is that

With better nutrition and more consistent health behaviors, many of these conditions can be resolved (or at least improved).

Message #1: Your gut instinct may be more accurate than you think.

The majority of the GI tract is a muscular tube that pushes food through using peristalsis, which is a series of repetitive muscle contractions similar to squeezing a tube of toothpaste.

Food is mushed up and chemically broken down as it passes through this tube, allowing us to absorb nutrients. And, of course, we expel it as poo once we’re done with it (or feces, if you would prefer the grown-up word).

Healthy poo is produced when your gut is healthy and everything is working properly. Problem poo can indicate that something is interfering with your gut’s usual functioning.

Things that could induce gut dysfunction, aside from microbial balance and food (which we’ll discuss in a minute), include:

  • nutrition shortages
  • issues with the autonomic nerve system (ANS)
  • Immune system issues
  • hormone misalignment
  • blood sugar fluctuations
  • bariatric surgery is an example of a medical procedure.
  • Circadian rhythm disturbance (e.g. jet lag, shift work)
  • Antibacterial and pain relievers are examples of drugs.
  • aging
  • Crohn’s disease and colitis are examples of chronic diseases.

Why should you be concerned?

When things go wrong in your stomach, you don’t always experience pain because of how the enteric nervous system—your gastrointestinal “brain”—works.

(Though you may experience too much agony at times.) This is known as “visceral hyper-sensitivity,” and it’s a common symptom of inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD.)

So, you may not constantly feel stomach pain, and you may be accustomed to “difficult poo.”

You may believe that if something isn’t broken, why fix it?

Many of the root issues in the preceding list are serious. At least a handful of them are serious enough to warrant a visit to your doctor.

The stomach bone is also related to the brain bone. Your central and autonomic nervous systems, which govern all voluntary and involuntary functions of the body, are in constant communication with your enteric nervous system.

According to new research, the quality of this transmission from the gut to the brain is influenced by the health of the GI tract.

As a result, if your stomach is dissatisfied, you may experience psychological and cognitive issues like:

  • Fog in the head
  • Anxiety, depression, or other mood disorders are all examples of mood disorders.
  • ADD/ADHD

You could also be suffering from other bodily issues, such as:

  • Having difficulties keeping your weight in check?
  • Allergies and asthma
  • autoimmune conditions
  • skin problems (e.g. rashes, acne)
  • Inflammation of the joints due to arthritis
  • illness of the heart
  • illness of the nervous system
  • narcolepsy or other forms of sleep deprivation
  • migraines
  • kidney issues

Obviously, this will make it difficult to look and feel your best.

What can be done about it?

Choose complete, minimally processed foods like fruit, vegetables, and fresh meat to receive the most nutrients for your gut.

Slowly and deliberately consume, and pay attention to your physical hunger and satiety indicators.

This will help you fill any gaps in your diet and ensure that your food doesn’t pass through your GI tract too rapidly, which can obstruct nutritional absorption.

And if you’re really worried (or even if you think you might be worried), it’s never a terrible idea to check in with your doctor to make sure there aren’t any more serious issues that need to be addressed.

Message #2: Your microbiome is out of whack.

The huge, sophisticated, and rich ecology of commensal, or friendly, bacteria (and occasionally fungi) that live on and around humans is known as our microbiome.

These microscopic creatures can be found in our nostrils, mouths, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI) tracts.

The bacteria in our gut, also known as gut flora, aid in the digestion and absorption of food by breaking down carbohydrates and assisting in the production of digestive enzymes.

Your microorganisms are doing their job if you have healthy poo. Your gut bacteria populations may have suffered a blow as a result of your problem feces. Travel, a change in food, or a course of antibiotics can all have an impact on gut microbes.

Why should you be concerned?

The gut flora performs a variety of functions in addition to digestion. These can include the following:

    • Defending the body against infections
    • Immune system enhancement
    • Vitamins like biotin (vitamin B7), folate (vitamin B9), and vitamin K are made in the body.

Let’s not forget that a weakened gut flora equals a weakened gut function—see above for a full list of health implications in that regard.

What can be done about it?

You’ll need a lot of intestinal critters of various varieties.

Eat meals that include prebiotics—starches that help keep beneficial microorganisms alive—to support the bacteria you already have. These include the following:

  • legumes and beans
  • fruits
  • grains in their entirety
  • Potatoes, sweet potatoes, taro/cassava, yuca, and other starchy plants and tubers

Experiment to see which foods suit you best, as some fermentable carbohydrates may irritate you (see Message 3 below).

Consider consuming more probiotic-rich foods to help your GI tract’s microbiome (another word for good bacteria). Yogurt or kefir, mold-enhanced cheese, and fermented foods like sauerkraut, pickles, and kimchi are all examples.

Eating a wide variety of fresh, whole, minimally processed foods, which naturally contain more bacteria than processed foods, can help to promote or support the diversity of your gut microbiota. Organic foods, which haven’t been treated with bacteria-killing pesticides, may offer even more variety.

Also, if nothing has been using your garden as a litter box, consider eating an occasional garden-picked fruit or vegetable without washing it.

Finally, antibiotics kill all bacteria in your system, not just the nasty ones, so don’t overuse them. (However, if you need a round of medicines, go ahead and take them!).

Your diet isn’t working for you, according to message #3.

It’s no surprise that your feces reflects what you eat. If you have bowel problems, your food could be affecting your GI function in a number of ways.

Fiber

Constipation, which can be caused by a lack of fiber, is indicated by types 1 and 2.

Fiber is necessary for optimal GI function and a healthy bowel movement because:

  • Fiber aids in the feeding of gut bacteria as well as the movement of food through the digestive tract.
  • Fiber binds to lipids and aids in the elimination of certain hormones (such as estrogens).
  • In the large intestine, fiber ferments, producing short-chain fatty acids, which are a vital source of energy for the body.
  • Fiber adds bulk and regularity to the diet, lowering our exposure to potentially harmful substances.
  • Finally, fiber breakdown maintains pH equilibrium, allowing beneficial bacteria to thrive in an ideal environment.

Sensitivities to foods

Certain foods irritate some people more than others. You may suffer symptoms ranging from constipation to frequent bathroom visits if you have a food sensitivity.

There are no two people who are exactly alike. What is effective for one individual may not be effective for another. (You may have heard that lentils are a superfood, but if they make your stomach turn, they’re probably not for you.)

The following are four common offenders:

  • lectins (seeds, grains, legumes, and nuts contain lectins);
  • Gluten and similar proteins (found in grains) are a type of gluten.
  • Dairy contains casein, lactose, and immunoglobulins; and
  • Many people have difficulty digesting fructose (also known as fruit sugars) and other sugars and starches (such as oligosaccharides or sugar alcohols).

Foods that have been processed

Some people are allergic to added sugars, refined grains, and food preservatives/additives like MSG, which are commonly present in processed meals.

What can be done about it?

Keep a food diary to monitor everything you consume as well as any symptoms you have. Food sensitivities don’t always manifest themselves straight away; they can take a few hours or even a day or two.

So keeping track of what you eat and how you feel for a week or two can reveal patterns you might otherwise overlook.

Your bowel motions (or lack thereof) will reflect whether you’re consuming foods that don’t agree with you or whether you’re deficient in critical nutrients.

Increase your intake of whole, fresh fruits and veggies, as well as whole grains. Keep track of which ones digest the best for you and add them to your menu.

When at all possible, avoid processed foods.

Consult your doctor or a nutritionist about an elimination diet if you feel you have a food sensitivity.

You’re dehydrated, according to message #4.

You might think you need more fiber if your poop is little and hard, but it could instead signify you aren’t receiving enough water.

Why should you be concerned?

Water aids in the removal of waste and the maintenance of healthy gut flora. These two items will not work successfully if you don’t drink enough water.

If the stomach requires water and isn’t getting it, it’ll seek it from somewhere else, perhaps jeopardizing other systems. You might get muscle cramps or a dry tongue, for example.

What can be done about it?

More water should be consumed, especially during and after workouts.

Take a look at how much you drink in general. What percentage of that is made up of juice, soda, caffeinated beverages, and/or alcohol? Could you replace those beverages with water, or at the very least alternate glasses of water with each beer or coffee?

Message #5: You’re overworked.

Keep in mind that your gastrointestinal tract is linked to your nervous system. Your “gut brain” and your “upstairs brain” communicate with one another.

Your brain and gut sense when you’re worried (or fearful, or apprehensive, or rushed, or overwhelmed), and your digestion slows down.

Have you ever found yourself unable to eat when you’re feeling really anxious? Because blood flow and enzyme production in the gut are restricted during times of stress, this is the case.

Because your body is focusing on coping with what it perceives as a threat, your GI system may slow down, causing constipation, bloating, and indigestion.

Alternatively, your body may have a “everyone out of the pool” policy, and things may pass you by.

Bottom line: If you’re constipated or have to go to the bathroom frequently, your stress levels may have crossed the line into harmful zone.

Why should you be concerned?

You could be dealing with: If your feces is alerting you that you’re overly stressed, you could also be dealing with:

  • anxiety
  • anger
  • Sadness, grief, and loss
  • depression
  • unable to concentrate
  • headaches
  • fatigue
  • issues with sleep
  • If you’re a woman, you may have reduced sex drive, poor fertility, and/or a disrupted menstrual cycle.

What can be done about it?

Stress should be taken seriously. Consider how you can look after yourself. (After all, you’re worth it.)

Make it a habit to de-stress on a regular basis.

Try something like:

  • going for a walk… or just being outside in general;
  • catching some rays and breathing some fresh air;
  • while listening to soothing music
  • meditating and other forms of awareness;
  • obtaining a massage
  • soaking in a hot tub;
  • Taking a few deep, cleansing breaths;
  • laughing;
  • cuddling with a loved one or a pet;
  • cuddling with a loved one or a pet;
  • gentle swimming or water immersion (in a hot tub, for example);
  • In a sauna, unwinding;
  • having sex (can you understand what I’m getting at? Who says nutrition counseling has to be dull? );
  • having sex (can you understand what I’m getting at? Who says nutrition counseling has to be dull? );

Message #6: Your exercise routine isn’t working.

Your poo may suffer if you don’t move your body enough or if you work out too hard.

Physical activity keeps both the exterior and inner systems of the body in good working order.

On the one hand, a sedentary lifestyle might contribute to constipation (as the saying goes, “use it or lose it” applies to your bowels as well).

Overtraining, on the other hand, can put a lot of strain on the body, resulting in a stressed state and loose or watery stools (see above).

So you want to strike the perfect balance between movement and recovery.

Why should you be concerned?

Aside from causing us to gain weight and lose bone and muscle mass, sedentary living has a slew of other issues. It may also cause constipation. Constipation is unpleasant.

Over-exercising, on the other hand, can harm your belly.

The gut receives more than half of all organ blood flow when at rest, but blood flow to the gut can decline to fewer than 20% during exercise. Increased intestinal permeability can be caused by a lack of blood flow to the gut during digestion (aka leaky gut).

Runner’s trots, or unexpected bouts of diarrhea when exercising, are also reported by many endurance athletes.

Leaky gut syndrome affects both endurance athletes and those with heart failure, which is ironic. In each scenario, not enough blood reaches the intestines (for reasons that are quite different).

What can be done about it?

Find activities to move your body that you enjoy so that “exercise” isn’t a chore. Are you going for a walk with your dog? Do you want to have a dance party with the kids? Yoga? Is it time to clean up the attic? Everyone has a specialty. You make your own decisions.

(Krista’s 90-year-old grandmother, who has always walked every day, believes, “A nice stroll cleans you out!”)

Keep a journal for a couple of weeks if you believe you’re overtraining. Consider the following example:

  • When you regulate your workouts, how do you feel during and afterward?
  • How does it feel to receive some active healing time, such as going for a swim or playing with your nephews on the playground?

Your feces should improve once you’ve found your optimal balance.

What to do next: Here are some suggestions from.

Here are some simple things to try if you think your feces (and habits) could use a makeover.

Turn around and take a peek at the ground.

Make a habit of monitoring the quality of your poo on a daily basis to get the most out of it as a health-assessment tool.

Start with a simple test using hydration, which is arguably the easiest variable to control, if you’re new to this practice:

  • Make a mental note of the quality of your poo the next time you have a chance.
  • Increase your daily water intake for the next seven days while making no other dietary modifications.
  • Increase your daily water intake for the next seven days while making no other dietary modifications.

Increase your daily water intake for the next seven days while making no other dietary modifications.

Increase your daily water intake for the next seven days while making no other dietary modifications.

Increase your daily water intake for the next seven days while making no other dietary modifications.

Increase your daily water intake for the next seven days while making no other dietary modifications.

Increase your daily water intake for the next seven days while making no other dietary modifications.

Increase your daily water intake for the next seven days while making no other dietary modifications.

Increase your daily water intake for the next seven days while making no other dietary modifications.

Increase your daily water intake for the next seven days while making no other dietary modifications.

But don’t go full-on scorched-earth mode. Water and regular, non-antibacterial soap are typically sufficient.

Consume a wide range of fruits and vegetables.

Cast a wide net since diversity in your food means diversity in your nutritional intake and microbiota.

Increase your intake of cultured and fermented foods.

This could include foods such as:

  • yogurt, kefir, quark, and skyr are examples of fermented dairy.
  • yogurt made from fermented non-dairy milk, such as almond or coconut milk
  • sauerkraut
  • kimchi and other pickled vegetables made in the Korean style (which are traditionally fermented rather than brined)
  • If you can locate it, traditional miso, tempeh, and tofu

You might also want to consider taking a probiotic supplement. Look for brands that have the Good Manufacturing Process (GMP) sticker in North America.

Slowly eat

Take your time tasting your food and observing how it affects you.

Slowing down will assist your GI tract in doing its function (it hates to be rushed). It will assist you in eating the proper amount for your body.

Diet intolerances can be detected by paying attention to how your food makes you feel.

All of these things contribute to a healthy weight, gastrointestinal function, and bowel movements.

If you’re worried about a food sensitivity, allergy, or intolerance, talk to your doctor or a nutritionist about doing an elimination diet.

Keep yourself hydrated.

Water is required to carry food through our gastrointestinal tract.

Drink plenty of water, especially on hot days and while you’re exercising.

Take control of your anxiety.

Stress can be harmful to your health.

Try some stress management tactics to improve the quality of your sleep if stress or anxiety is clogging or opening the sluice gates.

Allow yourself enough time to use the restroom. Respect your body’s requirements; if you need to empty your colon, do so.

Plant a garden and/or visit a farm.

Join a community garden project if you live in a city. If you can, visit a farm once in a while to get some fresh produce and get some dirt under your fingernails.

Beneficial soil bacteria (such as Mycobacterium vaccae, which has antidepressant and immune system boosting properties) can help diversity your microbiome.

A little fresh air and time among the plants might also help to reduce stress.

Know when it’s time to visit the doctor.

Speak to your doctor if you observe crimson in your feces that isn’t caused by red gummi bears or beets.

While the presence of blood (which might be red or black) can be harmless (for example, hemorrhoids), it can also be dangerous (such as colon cancer).

A quick glance at your feces isn’t enough to determine your overall health. However, it can alert you to potential health issues, and early detection is critical.

Don’t try to diagnose something weird with your poo on your own; instead, consult your doctor.

Get your microbiome checked if you’re inquisitive.

You can now learn more about your own unique microbiota thanks to contemporary research. You can test your microbiome using an online kit using applications like Viome.

Keep in mind that there is currently no industry standard. We still don’t know what the “ideal” microbiome balance is. A test, on the other hand, might reveal the fundamentals, such as the diversity of your internal ecology.

Finally, remember that your friends at are always here to help whenever you need it, whether it’s with diet, stress management, or movement.

We’re concerned about you… and your feces!

Do you want to be the healthiest, fittest, and strongest version of yourself?

Most people are aware that getting enough exercise, eating well, sleeping well, and managing stress are all vital for looking and feeling better. However, they require assistance in putting that information into practice in the context of their hectic, sometimes stressful lives.

Over the last 15 years, we’ve used the Coaching technique to assist over 100,000 people lose weight, gain strength, and improve their health… for the long haul… no matter what obstacles they face.

It’s also why, through our Level 1 and Level 2 Certification programs, we teach health, fitness, and wellness professionals how to coach their own clients through similar issues.

Interested in becoming a coach? Join the presale list to save up to 54% and get a spot 24 hours before the general public.

On Wednesday, July 14th, 2021, we will be accepting applications for our upcoming Coaching.

If you’re interested in learning more about coaching, I recommend signing up for our presale list below. Being on the list provides you with two distinct benefits.

  • You’ll get a better deal than everyone else. We like to reward the folks that are the most enthusiastic and motivated since they always make the best customers. If you join the presale list, you’ll save up to 54% off the general public pricing, the lowest we’ve ever offered.
  • You’ll have a better chance of getting a spot. We only open the program twice a year to ensure that clients receive the special care and attention they need. We sold out in minutes the last time we started registration. By signing up for the presale list, you’ll be able to register 24 hours before the general public, enhancing your chances of getting in.

This is your chance to transform your body and your life with the guidance of the world’s greatest instructors.

[Note: If you currently have your health and fitness under control but want to help others, look into our Level 1 Certification program.]

References

To see the information sources mentioned in this article, go here.

Ahmed, Z., Wang, Y., Ahmad, A., Khan, S. T., Nisa, M., Ahmad, H., & Afreen, A. (2013). Kefir and health: a contemporary perspective. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 53(5), 422–34. http://doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2010.540360

Asher, G., & Sassone-Corsi, P. (2015). Time for food: The intimate interplay between nutrition, metabolism, and the circadian clock. Cell, 161(1). http://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2015.03.015

Tack J, Beek AP, Emous M, Emous M, Emous M, Emous M, Emous M, Emous M, Emous M, Emous M, Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy of dumping syndrome after esophageal, gastric, or bariatric surgery. Obesity Reviews, January 1, 2016.

Dumping syndrome: a review of current pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapy approaches. Berg P, McCallum R. Diseases of the stomach and intestines, as well as studies related to them. 61(1):11-8, 1 January 2016.

R. Burcelin, R. Burcelin, R. Burcelin, R (2016). In metabolic illness, the gut microbiota and immunological interaction are important. 771–81 in Molecular Metabolism, 5(9). http://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmet.2016.05.016

B. Burton-Freeman, B. Burton-Freeman, B. Burton-Freeman (2000). Fiber in the diet and energy balance 272S–275S in The Journal of Nutrition, 130(2S Suppl). Obtainable at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10721886.

Butova TS, Stepanenko AL, Kutsyna GA, Jirathitikal V, Bourinbaiar AS, Butov DA, Efremenko YV, Prihoda ND, Zaitzeva SI, Yurchenko LV, Sokolenko NI, Butova TS, Stepanenko AL, Kutsyna GA, Jirathitikal V, Bourinbaiar AS Heat-killed Mycobacterium vaccae (Immodulon batch) produced as an oral pill was studied in a randomized, placebo-controlled Phase II experiment (V7). Immunotherapy. doi: 10.2217/imt.13.110. 2013 Oct;5(10):1047-54. PMID: 24088075 in PubMed.

Cananzi FC, Mudan S, Dunne M, Belonwu N, Dalgleish AG. Long-term survival and outcome of patients originally given Mycobacterium vaccae for metastatic malignant melanoma. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics. 2013;9(11):2427-2433. doi:10.4161/hv.25618.

Cani, P. D., & Knauf, C. (2016). How gut microbes talk to organs: The role of endocrine and nervous routes. Molecular Metabolism, 5(9), 743–52. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmet.2016.05.011

P. D. Cani and C. Knauf, Cani and Knauf, Cani and Knauf, Cani and Knauf, Cani and Knauf, Cani (2016). The function of endocrine and neurological systems in how gut microorganisms communicate with organs. 743–52 in Molecular Metabolism, 5(9). http://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmet.2016.05.011

P. D. Cani and C. Knauf, Cani and Knauf, Cani and Knauf, Cani and Knauf, Cani and Knauf, Cani (2016). The function of endocrine and neurological systems in how gut microorganisms communicate with organs. 743–52 in Molecular Metabolism, 5(9). http://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmet.2016.05.011

Diaz-Gerevini, G. T., Repossi, G., Dain, A., Tarres, M. C., Das, U. N., & Eynard, A. R. (2016). Beneficial action of resveratrol: How and why? Nutrition, 32(2), 174–178. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2015.08.017

Dinan, T. G., & Cryan, J. F. (2015). The impact of gut microbiota on brain and behaviour: implications for psychiatry. Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, 18(6), 552–8. http://doi.org/10.1097/MCO.0000000000000221

Dinan, T. G., & Cryan, J. F. (2016). Gut Instincts: microbiota as a key regulator of brain development, ageing and neurodegeneration. The Journal of Physiology. http://doi.org/10.1113/JP273106

Differences in Gut Microbiota Between Atopic and Healthy Children. Drell T, Larionova A, Voor T, Simm J, Julge K, Heilman K, Tillmann V, tepetova J, Sepp E. Microbiology in Context. Epub 2015 Apr 14. 2015 Aug;71(2):177-83. doi: 10.1007/s00284-015-0815-9.

Ericsson, K. A., Krampe, R. T., & Tesch-Römer, C. (1993). The role of deliberate practice in the acquisition of expert performance. Psychological Review, 100(3), 363–406. http://doi.org/10.1037/0033-295X.100.3.363

Population-level analysis of gut microbiota variation, Falony G, et al. Science. 2016 Apr 29;352(6285):560-4. doi: 10.1126/science.aad3503. Epub 2016 Apr 28. Science. 2016 Apr 29;352(6285):560-4.

Felice, V. D., Moloney, R. D., Cryan, J. F., Dinan, T. G., & O’Mahony, S. M. (2015). Visceral Pain and Psychiatric Disorders. Modern Trends in Pharmacopsychiatry, 30, 103–19. http://doi.org/10.1159/000435936

Furness, J. B., Callaghan, B. P., Rivera, L. R., & Cho, H.-J. (2014). The Enteric Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Innervation: Integrated Local and Central Control (pp. 39–71). http://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-0897-4_3

Furness, J. B., Rivera, L. R., Cho, H.-J., Bravo, D. M., & Callaghan, B. (2013). The gut as a sensory organ. Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 1010(1212), 729–740. http://doi.org/10.1038/nrgastro.2013.180

Stool consistency as a major confounding factor impacting microbiota composition: an overlooked variable? Gilbert JA, Alverdy J. Epub 2015 Jul 17. Gut. 2016 Jan;65(1):1-2. doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2015-310043.

M. Goffredo, K. Mass, E. J. Parks, D. A. Wagner, E. A. McClure, J. Graf N. Santoro, N. Santoro, N. Santoro (2016). The Gut Microbiota and Short Chain Fatty Acids Play a Role in Energy Harvest and Fat Partitioning in Children and Adolescents. http://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2016-1797 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Gururajan, A., Clarke, G., Dinan, T. G., & Cryan, J. F. (2016). Molecular biomarkers of depression. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 64, 101–33. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2016.02.011

S. M. Harakeh, I. Khan, T. Kumosani, E. Barbour, S. B. Almasaudi, S. M. Bahijri,… E. I. Azhar, E. I. Azhar, E. I. Azhar (2016). The Gut Microbiota Plays a Role in Obesity Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, vol. 6, no. 95, is a journal dedicated to the study of cellular and infection microbiology. http://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2016.00095

Immunology of atopic dermatitis: fresh insights into pathogenesis and immunomodulatory treatments, Harskamp CT, Armstrong AW. 2013 Sep;32(3):132-9. Semin Cutan Med Surg. 2013 Sep;32(3):132-9.

J. Heo, M. Seo, H. Park, W. K. Lee, L. L. Guan, J. Yoon,… H. Kim (n.d.). Weight Gain and Adipocyte Sizes in High Fat-Fed Mice Correlate with Gut Microbiota Modulation by Probiotics and Garcinia Cambogia Extract. 33566, Scientific Reports, vol. 6, no. http://doi.org/10.1038/srep33566

A. E. Hoban, R. M. Stilling, F. J. Ryan, F. Shanahan, T. G. Dinan, M. J. Claesson,… J. F. Cryan, J. F. Cryan, J. F. Cryan (2016). The microbiome regulates myelination in the prefrontal cortex. e774 in Translational Psychiatry. http://doi.org/10.1038/tp.2016.42

Nagata N, Yamamoto-Honda R, et al. Ihana-Sugiyama N, Nagata N, Yamamoto-Honda R, et al. Diabetes and its related variables are linked to constipation, hard stools, fecal urgency, and incomplete evacuation, but not diarrhea. 2016;22(11):3252-3260 in World Journal of Gastroenterology. doi:10.3748/wjg.v22.i11.3252.

J. R. Kelly, Y. Borre, C. O’ Brien, E. Patterson, S. El Aidy, J. Deane, Y. Borre, Y. Borre, Y. Borre, Y. Borre, Y. Borre, Y. Borre, Y. Borre, Y. Borre, Y. Borre, Y. T. G. Dinan, T. G. Dinan, T. G. Dinan (2016). Transferring the blues: In the rat, depression-related gut microbiota causes neurobehavioural alterations. Psychiatric Research, vol. 82, no. 1, pp. 109–18. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2016.07.019

Kelly, J. R., Clarke, G., Cryan, J. F., & Dinan, T. G. (2016). Brain-gut-microbiota axis: challenges for translation in psychiatry. Annals of Epidemiology, 26(5), 366–72. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2016.02.008

KJ Koecher, W Thomas, and JL Slavin. On enteral diets, healthy participants experience bowel changes: adding a fiber blend reduces stool weight and decreases gut bacteria without affecting gas. J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2015 Mar;39(3):337-43. doi: 10.1177/0148607113510523. Epub 2013 Nov 14. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2015 Mar;39(3):337-43. doi: 10.1177/0148607113510523.

Kong LC, Tap J, Aron-Wisnewsky J, Pelloux V, Basdevant A, Bouillot JL, Zucker JD, Doré J, Clément K. Kong LC, Tap J, Aron-Wisnewsky J, Pelloux V, Basdevant A, Bouillot JL, Zucker JD, Doré J, Clément K. Increased richness and correlations of bacterial genera with adipose tissue genes in the gut microbiota following gastric bypass in human obesity. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.113.058743. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jul;98(1):16-24. The 29th of May, 2013, was the deadline for submissions.

Emerging role of fecal microbiota therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal illnesses, Konturek PC, Haziri D, Brzozowski T, Hess T, Heyman S, Kwiecien S, Konturek SJ, Koziel J. 2015 Aug;66(4):483-91 in J Physiol Pharmacol.

T. Levkovich, T. Poutahidis, C. Smillie, B. J. Varian, Y. M. Ibrahim, J. R. Lakritz, S. E. Erdman, T. Poutahidis, T. Poutahidis, T. Poutahidis, T. Poutahidis, T. Poutahidis, T. Poutahidis, T. Poutahidis, T. Pouta (2013). Probiotic microorganisms produce a “healthy glow.” PloS One, vol. 8, no. 1, e53867. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0053867

Ley, R. E., Turnbaugh, P. J., Klein, S., & Gordon, J. I. (2006). Microbial ecology: Human gut microbes associated with obesity. Nature, 444(7122), 1022–1023. http://doi.org/10.1038/4441022a

P. J. Lillford, J. Chen, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P. Lillford, P R. F. Mithen, R. F. Mithen, R. F. Mithen (2016). Taste and digestibility are influenced by dietary structure. 23, 1 Food Funct. http://doi.org/10.1039/C5FO01375E

S. Louis, R. M. Tappu, A. Damms-Machado, D. H. Huson, and S. C. Bischoff. Using Whole Metagenome Shotgun Sequencing, Characterization of the Gut Microbial Community of Obese Patients Following a Weight-Loss Intervention. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(2):e0149564. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0149564. Covasa M, ed.

Lowry CA, Smith DG, Siebler PH, Schmidt D, Stamper CE, Hassell JE, Yamashita PS, Fox JH, Reber SO, Brenner LA, Hoisington AJ, Yamashita PS, Yamashita PS, Yamashita PS, Yamashita PS, Yamashita PS, Yamashita PS, Yamashita PS, Yamashita PS, Yamashita PS, Yamashit Implications for Public Health: Microbiota, Immunoregulation, and Mental Health Current Environmental Health Reports, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 270-86, September 1, 2016.

Y. Luo, G.-L. Chen, N. Hannemann, N. Ipseiz, G. Krönke, T. Bäuerle, Y. Luo, Y. Luo, Y. Luo, Y. Luo, Y. Luo, Y. Luo, Y. Luo, Y. Luo, Y. Luo, Y. Luo, Y. Luo A. Bozec, A. Bozec, A. Bozec, A (2015). Obese Mice Microbiota Alters the Bone Niche to Regulate Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation. Metabolism in Cells (Vol. 22).

Ly, N. P., Litonjua, A., Gold, D. R., & Celedón, J. C. (2011). Gut microbiota, probiotics, and vitamin D: Interrelated exposures influencing allergy, asthma, and obesity? The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 1087–1094. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2011.02.015

Ly, N. P., Litonjua, A., Gold, D. R., & Celedón, J. C. (2011). Gut microbiota, probiotics, and vitamin D: Interrelated exposures influencing allergy, asthma, and obesity? The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 1087–1094. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2011.02.015

Associations of Bowel Movement Frequency with Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Mortality Among US Women, Ma W, Rimm EB, Rexrode KM, Qi L. 133(Suppl 1):AP080-. Circulation. 2016 Mar 1;133(Suppl 1):AP080-.

Mayer, E. A., Knight, R., Mazmanian, S. K., Cryan, J. F., & Tillisch, K. (2014). Gut microbes and the brain: paradigm shift in neuroscience. The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 34(46), 15490–6. http://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3299-14.2014

Muñoz-Garach, A., Diaz-Perdigones, C., & Tinahones, F. J. (2016). Gut microbiota and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Endocrinologia Y Nutricion : Organo de La Sociedad Espanola de Endocrinologia Y Nutricion. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.endonu.2016.07.008

G. Parthasarathy, J. Chen, X. Chen, N. Chia, H. M. O’Connor, P. G. Wolf, H. R. Gaskins, and A. E. Bharucha. In female patients with chronic constipation, there is a link between the microbiota of the colonic mucosa and feces, as well as symptoms, colonic transit, and methane production. Doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2015.10.005. Epub 2015 Oct 13. Gastroenterology. 2016 Feb;150(2):367-79.e1. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2015.10.005.

K. Parvaneh, M. Ebrahimi, M. R. Sabran, G. Karimi, A. N. M. Hwei, S. Abdul-Majeed R. Jamaluddin, R. Jamaluddin, R. Jamaluddin (2015). In rats suffering from bone loss, probiotics (Bifidobacterium longum) increase bone mass density and upregulate the genes Sparc and Bmp-2.

Ovariectomy. 897639, BioMed Research International, 2015. http://doi.org/10.1155/2015/897639 T. Poutahidis, M. Kleinewietfeld, C. Smillie, T. Levkovich, A. Perrotta, S. Bhela, T. Perrotta, T. Perrotta, T. Perrotta, T. Perrotta, T. Perrotta, T. Perrotta, T. Perrotta, T. Perrotta, T. Perrotta, T. Perrotta, T. Perrotta S. E. Erdman, S. E. Erdman, S. E. Erdman (2013). Obesity caused by a Western diet is prevented by microbial reprogramming. PloS One, vol. 8, no. 7, e68596. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0068596

T. Poutahidis, A. Springer, T. Levkovich, P. Qi, B. J. Varian, J. R. Lakritz S. E. Erdman, S. E. Erdman, S. E. Erdman (2014). In aged rats, probiotic bacteria maintain youthful serum testosterone levels and testicular size. PloS One, vol. 9, no. 1, e84877, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0084877

T. Poutahidis, A. Springer, T. Levkovich, P. Qi, B. J. Varian, J. R. Lakritz S. E. Erdman, S. E. Erdman, S. E. Erdman (2014). In aged rats, probiotic bacteria maintain youthful serum testosterone levels and testicular size. PloS One, vol. 9, no. 1, e84877, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0084877

Pusceddu, M. M., Kelly, P., Stanton, C., Cryan, J. F., & Dinan, T. G. (2016). N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids through the Lifespan: Implication for Psychopathology. The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology / Official Scientific Journal of the Collegium Internationale Neuropsychopharmacologicum (CINP). http://doi.org/10.1093/ijnp/pyw078

Rao, A. V., Bested, A. C., Beaulne, T. M., Katzman, M. A., Iorio, C., Berardi, J. M., & Logan, A. C. (2009). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of a probiotic in emotional symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome. Gut Pathogens, 1(1), 6. http://doi.org/10.1186/1757-4749-1-6

G. Reid (2016). Can the microbiome in the breast help to prevent cancer? Future Microbiology, vol. 11, no. 9, pp. 987–9, doi:10.2217/fmb-2016-0138

M. Remely, I. Tesar, B. Hippe, S. Gnauer, P. Rust, and A. Haslberger. The makeup of the gut microbiota is linked to changes in body fat content as a result of weight loss. 2015;6(4):431-9. doi: 10.3920/BM2014.0104. Epub 2015 Feb 12. Benef Microbes. 2015;6(4):431-9. doi: 10.3920/BM2014.0104.

Ridaura, V., & Belkaid, Y. (2015). Gut Microbiota: The Link to Your Second Brain. Cell, 161(2), 193–194. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2015.03.033

R. C. Robertson, C. Seira Oriach, K. Murphy, G. M. Moloney, J. F. Cryan, T. G. Dinan, R. C. Robertson, R. C. Robertson, R. C. Robertson, R. C. Robertson, R. C. Robertson, R. C. Robertson, R. C. Robertson, R. C. Robertson, R. C. Robertson, R. C. Stanton, C. Stanton, C. Stanton, C (2016). In adolescence and maturity, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have a vital role in behavior and gut microbiota formation. Immunity, Behavior, and the Brain http://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2016.07.145

Sherwin, E., Rea, K., Dinan, T. G., & Cryan, J. F. (2016). A gut (microbiome) feeling about the brain. Current Opinion in Gastroenterology, 32(2), 96–102. http://doi.org/10.1097/MOG.0000000000000244

Sherwin, E., Sandhu, K. V, Dinan, T. G., & Cryan, J. F. (2016). May the Force Be With You: The Light and Dark Sides of the Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis in Neuropsychiatry. CNS Drugs. http://doi.org/10.1007/s40263-016-0370-3

B. Shirouchi, K. Nagao, M. Umegatani, A. Shiraishi, Y. Morita, S. Kai, A. Shiraishi, A. Shiraishi, A. Shiraishi, A. Shiraishi, A. Shiraishi, A. Shiraishi, A. Shiraishi, A. Shiraishi, A. Shiraishi, A. Shirai M. Sato (2016). By boosting energy expenditure, the probiotic Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 improves glucose tolerance and lowers body weight gain in rats. 451–8 in The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 116, no. 3. http://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114516002245

H. Sokol, B. Pigneur, L. Watterlot, O. Lakhdari, L. G. Bermdez-Humarán, J.-J. Gratadoux, H. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur P. Langella (2008). The anti-inflammatory commensal bacteria Faecalibacterium prausnitzii was discovered in the gut microbiome of Crohn’s disease patients. 16731–6 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, volume 105, number 43. http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0804812105

H. Sokol, B. Pigneur, L. Watterlot, O. Lakhdari, L. G. Bermdez-Humarán, J.-J. Gratadoux, H. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur, B. Pigneur P. Langella (2008). The anti-inflammatory commensal bacteria Faecalibacterium prausnitzii was discovered in the gut microbiome of Crohn’s disease patients. 16731–6 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, volume 105, number 43. http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0804812105

I. Spreadbury (2012). Dense acellular carbs, when compared to ancestral diets, appear to produce an inflammatory microbiota and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity. Targets and Therapy for Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, and Obesity, 5, 175–89. http://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S33473

Stilling, R. M., van de Wouw, M., Clarke, G., Stanton, C., Dinan, T. G., & Cryan, J. F. (2016). The neuropharmacology of butyrate: The bread and butter of the microbiota-gut-brain axis? Neurochemistry International, 99, 110–32. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuint.2016.06.011

Taba Taba Vakili S, Nezami BG, Shetty A, Chetty VK, Srinivasan S. Association of high dietary saturated fat intake and uncontrolled diabetes with constipation: Evidence from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Neurogastroenterology & Motility. 2015 Oct 1;27(10):1389-97.

Tap J, Furet JP, Bensaada M, Philippe C, Roth H, Rabot S, Lakhdari O, Lombard V, Henrissat B, Corthier G, Fontaine E, Doré J, Leclerc M. Tap J, Furet JP, Bensaada M, Philippe C, Roth H, Rabot S, Lakhdari O, Lombard V, Henrissat B, Corthier G When healthy individuals consume more dietary fiber, their gut microbiome becomes more stable. 10.1111/1462-2920.13006. Epub 2015 Sep 3. Environ Microbiol. 2015 Dec;17(12):4954-64. doi: 10.1111/1462-2920.13006.

M. W. Taylor, M. W. Taylor, M. W. Taylor, M (2016). The devil is in the details: a closer look at childhood obesity and the microbiota in the stomach. Environmental Microbiology is the study of microbes in the environment. http://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.13540

Urbaniak, C., Gloor, G. B., Brackstone, M., Scott, L., Tangney, M., & Reid, G. (2016). The Microbiota of Breast Tissue and Its Association with Breast Cancer. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 82(16), 5039–48. http://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01235-16

Vandeputte D, Falony G, Vieira-Silva S, Tito RY, Joossens M, Raes J. Vandeputte D, Falony G, Vieira-Silva S, Tito RY, Joossens M, Raes J. Stool consistency is linked to the diversity and makeup of the gut microbiota, as well as enterotypes and bacterial growth rates. Epub 2015 Jun 11. Gut. 2016 Jan;65(1):57-62. doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2015-309618.

TL Weir, DK Manter, AM Sheflin, BA Barnett, AL Heuberger, EP Ryan. Colorectal cancer patients and healthy adults have different stools microbiomes and metabolomes. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(8):e70803. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0070803. White BA, ed.

Linking Long-Term Dietary Patterns with Gut Microbial Enterotypes, Wu GD, Chen J, Hoffmann C, et al. doi:10.1126/science.1208344. Science 334(6052):105-108, 2011.

X-Y Yang, Q-F Chen, Y-P Li, and S-M Wu. Mycobacterium vaccae as an Anti-Tuberculosis Adjuvant A Meta-Analysis of Chemotherapy in Tuberculosis Patients Who Have Never Been Treated. PLoS ONE 6(9):e23826; Cardona P-J, ed. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0023826.

Yiu, J. H. C., Dorweiler, B., & Woo, C. W. (2016). Interaction between gut microbiota and toll-like receptor: from immunity to metabolism. Journal of Molecular Medicine (Berlin, Germany). http://doi.org/10.1007/s00109-016-1474-4

 

This text is sensitive. Try generating new copy.. Read more about is pooping good for you and let us know what you think.

{“@context”:”https://schema.org”,”@type”:”FAQPage”,”mainEntity”:[{“@type”:”Question”,”name”:”Why are healthy bowels important?”,”acceptedAnswer”:{“@type”:”Answer”,”text”:”
Healthy bowels are important because they help the body to function properly. They also help to prevent diseases such as constipation, diarrhea, and irritable bowel syndrome.”}},{“@type”:”Question”,”name”:”When should your poop concern you?”,”acceptedAnswer”:{“@type”:”Answer”,”text”:”
When it is green and smells like rotten eggs.”}},{“@type”:”Question”,”name”:”Does poop contain anything healthy?”,”acceptedAnswer”:{“@type”:”Answer”,”text”:”
Poop is made up of mostly water and some nutrients. It also contains dead cells, bacteria, and other waste products that are removed from the body through the digestive system.”}}]}

Frequently Asked Questions

Why are healthy bowels important?

Healthy bowels are important because they help the body to function properly. They also help to prevent diseases such as constipation, diarrhea, and irritable bowel syndrome.

When should your poop concern you?

When it is green and smells like rotten eggs.

Does poop contain anything healthy?

Poop is made up of mostly water and some nutrients. It also contains dead cells, bacteria, and other waste products that are removed from the body through the digestive system.

Related Tags

This article broadly covered the following related topics:

  • why do i poop so much
  • what does it mean if you poop a lot
  • why do i poop so much in the morning
  • what your poop says about your health
  • pooping a lot in one day